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Do Newark's City Employees Get Paid Too Much?

A man protested against how much city employees are getting paid outside the State of the City Address.

As city leaders gathered at the last week to hear Mayor Al Nagy speak on how to expand Newark's economic development, one man stood outside to stand up against city employees' six-figure salaries.

A large sign leaned against a light pole with the salaries of the Newark's city manager, community development director, human resources director and police chief painted in white.

The Newark resident, John Henneberry, said his objective is to bring awareness to how much certain city employees get paid per year.

According to a city document provided by City Clerk Sheila Harrington, the base annual salaries as of 2011-12 for the positions are as follows:

  • City Manager John Becker: $205,234
  • Community Development Director Terrence Grindall: $171,011
  • Human Resources Director Abe Asako: $168,000
  • Police Chief James Leal: $188,508

(These figures do not reflect figures pertaining to medical, overtime, pension 401K or other wages that certain city employees are given.)

Collectively, city employee salaries total approximately $14.5 million a year.

Newark Patch plans to futher analyze the salaries of city employees. Check back for a more detailed report in the future.

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Mars April 25, 2012 at 12:07 AM
I have lived on one of the streets I know what you mean about the street sweeper. Sounds like the problem may not be so much the salary as the talent behind it in some of those cases.
Lisa Kphotoalbums April 25, 2012 at 03:24 AM
Not only the 'amount' of the top of the cities pyramid bothers me...but, I have always questioned the Need for 'assistant' this and that...Mayor, vice mayor, manager then vice mayor...director then director assistant...how many upper managers do we 'need' to cover our little town? Especially, since They do not do IT WELL, and for THAT amount of Money???
Albert Rubio April 25, 2012 at 06:59 AM
You hit the nail on the head Lisa. Most government programs are giant jobs projects. They then are able to organize and vote themselves more money. This is the explanation for how Public schools often have more administrators than teachers. I am for education, but not for a socialized compulsory government system that never has enough of everyone else's money. Another reason state programs are systematized perpetual fraud is because there is NO COMPETITION within the state apparatus or school system. What you have today is what you will have tomorrow at a greater price until schools are returned to the voluntary market and out of politics. Anti-capitalist sentiment is used to keep it that way so a few benefit while the many pay the costs. "Everyone wants to live at the expense of the state. They forget that the state wants to live at the expense of everyone else." - Bastiat
Albert Rubio April 28, 2012 at 04:27 AM
http://www.cato.org/cato-university/study_course/ The FREE AUDIO Cato Home Study Course immerses you in the thoughts and views of John Locke, Thomas Jefferson, Thomas Paine, James Madison, Adam Smith, Voltaire, John Stuart Mill, Henry David Thoreau, Ayn Rand, F.A. Hayek, Milton Friedman, and others. You are stimulated and surrounded by their ground-breaking ideas on liberty, justice, property, constitutionalism, free trade, capitalism, toleration, and peace. Each program is presented by professional actors and broadcasters, and the content is lively, dynamic, and truly thought-provoking: The Ideas of Liberty John Locke's Two Treatises of Government Thomas Paine's Common Sense and Thomas Jefferson and the Declaration of Independence Adam Smith's The Wealth of Nations (pt 1) Adam Smith's The Wealth of Nations (pt 2) The Constitution of the United States of America The Bill of Rights and subsequent amendments to the Constitution John Stuart Mill's On Liberty and Mary Wollstonecraft's Vindication of the Rights of Woman Thoreau's Civil Disobedience and William Lloyd Garrison's The Liberator The Achievement of 19th Century Classical Liberalism The "Austrian" Case for the Free Market The Modern Quest for Liberty Recommended Reading Libertarianism: A Primer by David Boaz The Libertarian Reader by David Boaz, ed. The Encyclopedia of Libertarianism by Ronald Hamowy, ed. Realizing Freedom: Libertarian Theory, History, and Practice by Tom G. Palmer
Lisa Kphotoalbums February 07, 2013 at 05:00 AM
My previous job may go federal, if it does it would decrease in both pay and benefits...although I do not believe calling medical a benefit but a a necessity. If we lose even more, salary wise, it would be impossible for a single person to pay for basics in the Bay Area...and families, hahahaha. Sometimes we forget how much it truly costs to live in the Bay Area. Add to that the types of jobs one is doing...I think most of the jobs at the City do deserve their salary. However, there is so much redundancy in upper management which seems unnecessary and expensive. It also seems the higher you go the less you do... I ask you; how much 'should' the employees of Newark be earning?? How do you come up with your Earnings schedule?? At two people working we were doing ok, if no emergencies, now with one it is paycheck to squeak paycheck. I am ill now so not working, if you are asking 'why aren't you working?' Yes, when money is less we do less shopping, eating out, etc. You still have to be able to pay rent/mortgage, PG&E, Car Fuel, and basics. And agree with you, Albert, I often wonder at those making 6 times and benefits while my benefits, haha, was tripled Jan 1st. and I get to pay three times more for the 'new' health insurance which has tripled the office copay, hospital stay, etc.

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